Movie Wreckage

The movie was a wreckage, that’s why they didn’t want me. Said it would be confusing to the audience from a marketing standpoint.


Toy Story
For the first live action Transformers movie, a lot of concept art and characters were thrown about. And one of those was for a green armored personnel carrier by name of Stryka. While Stryka didn’t make the cut into the movie, the toy was made anyway. Only with a diff color scheme and under the name of Wreckage.

Bio-wise, Wreckage is the opposite of Bonecrusher, which is why I like to pair those two together as some assassin duo or something. Unlike the hotheaded and destructive type that many Decepticons are, Wreckage is a cold blooded killer. He likes to make the kill up close and personal, but otherwise keeps a cool head.

Given that the majority of Decepticons are mindless brutes, I kinda like Wreckage’s bio, though it’s nothing particularly “out there”.

Toy
Vehicle mode is as mentioned, an APC. It’s pretty cool with lots of details and stuff. Some don’t dig his urban/ice camo, but I dig it personally. The wheels might not be exactly even if you haven’t properly transform him (more on that later) but otherwise, it’s a good mode. The white doesn’t bring out the details too well but overall, Wreckage looks neat if a little vanilla.

Transformation is simple once you understand that it’s basically just Wreckage standing up from a fetal position. With the way his head is angled and his hands are molded, he pretty much looks like he’s clutching his head in trauma if you look at the vehicle’s underside kibble.

Oh, and here’s the obligatory Gerwalk mode.

Wreckage also holds the honor of having one of the better “Automorph” features of the early releases. Swinging his chest down will also swing his arms up and pop his head up for the dramatic head reveal.

Now onto robot mode.

When Wreckage first came out, he was arguably one of, if not the best Movie Deluxe available. And I’m inclined to agree. He’s been surpassed since, but when he came out, he was easily one of the best.

Wreckage had plenty of advantages. He was decidedly less “Bayformer” than his brethren, and generally more humanly proportioned. And with his bucket head, he was reminiscent of G1 Megatron. It also didn’t hurt that he had a reasonably decent facsimile of a face. Something that not all Movie figures could boast about.

His biggest problem is that his head is permanently angled to look down, even more so than Classics Ironhide, so he’s incredibly emo looking.

So Wreckage looks good, but how does he play? I’ve said before that since the live action movie came out, Transformers toys have gotten way better in terms of articulation. This is one of the points I’m pleased about with Wreckage, despite a certain problem it resulted in.

And that problem? Remember when I mentioned something about properly transforming Wreckage? You see, Wreckage has waist articulation. But this articulation is so restricted by an unfortunately placed piece of kibble that he might as well not have waist articulation. On top of that, because of this point of articulation, his waist might not be perfectly aligned when you transform him, resulting in his wheels not being perfectly even in vehicle mode. It’s no biggie unless you have a personality such as mine, where that slight bit of imperfection can drive you craaaaaaaaaAAAAaaaazy!

Fortunately, it’s no big deal once you know how to properly align the waist. But yeah, the waist is restricted to the point of being almost useless, and is in fact, something of a detriment. Wreckage also has articulated wrists that are equally as useless due to restrictive bits.

That said, I can’t hold his articulation against him. Up until then, most Transformers didn’t even have wrists or waist articulation, even when they could have really used them. In this case, it’s a matter of “it’s the thought that counts”. It doesn’t really detract from the figure to have those points.

Otherwise, Wreckage has the standard Transformers articulation of the time. Swivel head, and the aforementioned waist and wrists. Balljointed shoulders, hips and nicest of all, ankles, which greatly enhances Wreckage’s posability, especially when you factor in his naturally occurring tripod feet. Wreckage also has double jointed elbows and knees, again, this is impressive. Although the knees can only bend back 90 degrees, but it can do a full 180 forwards.

While I’m fine that Wreckage doesn’t have swivel thighs, I do wish he has swivel biceps to help him fully utilize his elbows and shoulders. And speaking of shoulders, due to a lack of a locking mechanism on the chest, when you move the shoulders upward, it’s going to pull the chest up as a result of the Automorph. Not a big deal once you figure out how to properly play with him, but still an unnecessary annoyance.

Wreckage also comes with two flip out energon blades, which can be combined together to form a double sided blade ala Galtar and the Golden Lance (or for you Star Wars fans, Darth Maul’s double lightsaber).

Overall
For all his faults, Wreckage is still a good toy. He’s been overtaken as a Deluxe since his initial release, but even now, he’s still decent.

As you can see, my Wreckage is already starting to yellow, alas, dang tropical weather. So if you’re not into potential yellowing, but want a Wreckage anyway, there’s a new version of Wreckage coming out for the 2009 movie. He’s painted in his concept colors of green and bronze/brown. I’d put that one on the upper middle of your movie shopping list.

3.0 out of 4.0

———————————–
0.0 – 0.0 = I’d pay to get rid of it
0.1 – 0.5 = I’d give it away
0.6 – 1.0 = I wouldn’t take it for free
1.1 – 1.5 = Very Bad
1.6 – 2.0 = Bad
2.1 – 2.5 = Average
2.6 – 3.0 = Good
3.1 – 3.5 = Very Good
3.6 – 4.0 = Excellent

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This entry was posted in Toy Reviews, Transformers, Transformers Movie (2007) and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Movie Wreckage

  1. Julio says:

    You can also peg the combined blade on any of the wheels on his arms for spinning-blade-of-death action.

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